Teen Daze – The Inner Mansions album review



written by
Aaron Peart

If Aaron hadn't chosen to snowboard for the rest of his life, music would easily fill that hole. Avid gig-goer when finances and scheduling allows, he has seen everyone from Del tha Funky Homosapien to the Rolling Stones to Sharon Jones. An off-the-cuff writer, he started writing after he realised he would forget main aspects of the topic he spoke about... turned out he liked it. His non-musical musings can be found at the link below where you never really know what will come up. And yes. He is related to Neil.

It’s always exciting to review an artist from British Columbia. Having lived in BC for a number of years, more of the sonic and lyrical touchstones are relevant. “New Life” opens with what sounds like a public service announcement, or a HAL9000 intercom. Feels sterile, like what we’ll be listening to on Mars. This could be a transition from “All of us, Together”, a futuristic soundtrack to our utopia released earlier this year. The remainder of the album is more introspective: man’s place in this world of electronic crutches. “Garden 1” describes what sounds like a dream, and “Garden 2” follows this on with a weightless ode; the vocals are so airy, they’re almost not there.

“Discipleship” has a distinctive beat and brings to mind a journey, like telephone poles passing you outside the train window, and is a high point of the album. “By Love” is just as tender as you would expect. There’s even a harp in there! And hold onto your hats, because “Union” featuring Frankie Rose is a departure from the previous half of “Mansions”, as if the album just took a shot of espresso. “Spirit” has Remix written all over it, so keep an eye out for various renditions over the winter. And at 6 minutes long, the song undergoes a couple of different personas; the song at the end is not the song at the beginning.

The Inner Mansions is a great album; a counter to “All Of Us, Together”, two sides of the same coin. More focused on nature, both human and environmental, and a spiritual if not fully religious undertones. This will be what the machines will be listening to once they’ve overthrown our rule and want to feel nostalgic.


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