Zero 7 @ The Commodore Ballroom, Vancouver

Zero 7Zero 7 @ The Commodore Ballroom, Vancouver It’s a humid Saturday night in downtown Vancouver and hundreds are packed in the Commodore Ballroom awaiting the onstage arrival of UK electronica outfit, Henry Binns and Sam Hardaker — otherwise known collectively as Zero 7. Opening act Jose Gonzalez, vocalist on multiple tracks off Zero 7’s current and third album “The Garden”, treats us to his acoustic prowess and sombre singing style.

Badly Drawn Boy ends tour with dreary eyes, cigarettes and rye

Badly Drawn Boy “I need a break,” he says as he stops playing piano and lights up a cigarette. “You’ve seen me; I’ve been up here for fucking two hours.”

It was understandable that Damon Gough of Badly Drawn Boy was tired, as his band got stuck on the stateside border for four hours earlier in the day. Nevertheless, the fading enthusiasm just summed up what was little more than a mediocre live show.

Michael Franti & Spearhead @ The Commodore

Michael Franti SpearheadMichael Franti & Spearhead @ The Commodore As the familiar concert smoke flooded the ceiling region of Vancouver’s beautiful “Commodore Ballroom,” Xavier Rudd delved deeper into his amazing set. The Darwin born Australian one-man band stunned all in attendance, serving as the opening act. Rudd performed one of the best truly solo sets I’ve seen, utilizing three digereedos, several guitars of different variations, a harmonica suspended around his throat, a kick drum by his left foot and a microphone for his voice. Rudd affirmed the meaning of the word “independent.”

Citizen Cope @ Richards on Richards

Citizen CopeCitizen Cope @ Richards on Richards The last time Citizen Cope came through Vancouver, he performed at a small club. He was dubbed the “headliner” but there weren’t any other acts for him to reign over. Before he took the stage simply spun a Bob Marley compilation, which kept the eager crowd at bay. This time was different though. Cope performed for an audience with a couple hundred more members atop larger stage.

BREAKING NEWS: Anti-Flag storms Vancouver, seeks justice

Anti-FlagAnti-Flag original article

There is breaking news off the west coast of Canada tonight. Armed with guitar picks, drumsticks and a message, A New Kind of Army has landed on the shores of British Columbia and is marching east.

Anti-Flag, a pro-peace splinter-group of the international punk rock movement, is spearheading a mission into the heart of what has been dubbed The Terror State by the band.

Rise Against is for the Children

Rise Against original article

We can’t help being this way. It’s not a choice and it has never made life any easier, especially during the teenage years. There is one thing that is certain for anyone who was born with Punk Rock in their hearts: If you’re not old enough to drink, then you’re going to miss some shows. Kids are the lifeblood of the punk scene, and nobody relates more to the feelings of angst and being outcast then the mohawked teen that has dirty looks and pencil erasers thrown at their back as they walk down their high school hallways.

Metric – Pop Ain’t A Dirty Word

Emily Haines MetricMetric original article

You can’t always judge music by what it sounds like. Well, you could, and then you would probably say that Metric is a great pop band, but you would only be half right. While their 2003 release, Old World Underground, Where are you Now?, is catchy like flypaper, it sticks long enough for you to figure out what synth-playing singer Emily Haines is actually saying about pop-culture. The four-piece of no fixed address have been lazily labeled pop by many a music writer for singles like “Combat Baby”, in which Haines sings about “caffeine-free faux-punk fatigue,” over punked-up guitar riffs provided by James Shaw. And unlike any good pop band, they formed themselves. In 1998 two Canadian kids—Haines and Shaw—formed Metric in a Brooklyn loft. Since then drummer Joules Scott-Key and his Texas schoolmate Josh Winstead, who happens to play a mean bass guitar, have completed the band.