The Prairie Cartel unleash their debut full length “Where Did All My People Go”

The Prairie Cartel unleash their debut full length “Where Did All My People Go”

Double Wax package Released Novermber 17th on Long Nights, Impossible Odds
Distribution by Burnside & Ioda
Digital release date: October 27th, 2009
In stores: November 17th, 2009


For 10.5 months of the year there is little else to do in Chicago besides drink heavily. The Prairie Cartel started as an excuse for Scott Lucas (Local H), Blake Smith and Mike Willison (both ex-Caviar) to do this in Mike’s basement while playing their favorite records. Albums on DFA, Matador, Wax Trax, Modular and Creation were all in heavy rotation during those dark months except when the whisky came out and it went all Ummagumma on them. The obligatory, possibly illegal, and definitely messy DJ gigs followed. Warehouses and lofts trembled before their can’t-mix, won’t-even-try-to-mix majesty. They developed a reputation for sets that were somehow gloriously disheveled but still extremely satisfying. After a particularly delirious night behind, on top of, and in front of the decks in London where some teeth got chipped, a little blood got spilled, and the local authorities threatened to pull their passports, they decided the timing was perfect to pick their instruments back up and go home to cut a record.

They bought a couple of used microphones, a bi-polar Mac, and locked themselves back in Mike’s basement. For a long time. maybe longer than what is considered healthy by normal people. Empty bottles and pizza boxes piled up. Beards grew, got cut, and grew again. Creatures with tails scurried in shadowy corners. Friends and family became worried. But then 2 EPs suddenly emerged in quick succession to unanimously positive reviews and doors began to open for them. They got asked to put a song in the Grand Theft Auto video game. Then they got asked to create an entire channel for the hand-held version, achieving every artist’s dream of cornering the market in sound tracking virtual third-person deals of digital drugs.

So, with all things taking its course, rather than emerging to tour and possibly killing this creative streak, they decided to ride it out in their tiny room until somebody cracked. The exhilarating result of this is Where Did all my People Go.


From the warped raw warehouse party-provoking opener “Keep Everybody Warm” The Prairie Cartel start off their debut by giving everybody a shout out, “And what you gotta do, is keep yourself together. Keep everybody warm.” Emerging from the Chicago Urban underground TPC blur the line with their delectably industrial yet funky directions.

Sequenced in a continuous mix, the second tune in, “Suitcase Pimp” keeps the dirty rock alive with it’s seedy sleazy guitar line and gutter-nonsense lyrics: “Can I kick it can I lick, if I lick it if I lick will you like it?”

Recently award-winning Chinese director Peng Lei (an accomplished filmmaker/animator whose clay animation film “Beihai Monster” from 2006 was a hit in Chinese indie-film world and has won numerous awards) discovered The Prairie Cartel and is currently completing his psychedelic urban-yeti dance video for the track “No Light Escapes Here”.

As Peng explained to the lads, “The reason I wanted to direct this video was that I’m impressed with the lyrics to this song, and understand that the lyrics are about trying to express yourself artistically in an oppressive communist regime.” Musically he also felt connected, Peng Lei is a member of New Pants, one of the most revered bands in China’s contemporary music history who formed in 1996 and their early sound was influenced heavily by new wave and early punk rock, particularly the Ramones. And in true punk rock fashion, Peng takes a huge risk by using Mao all over the video. We will be world premiering this video soon.

From the Giorgio Moroder meets Modern Lovers groove of “Cracktown” to the WTF Ian Curtis frenetic freak out of “Fuck Yeah That Wide”, Where Have All My People Gone captures the anarchy and spirit of a mid-western band giddy to warp their electronics with the necks of their guitars. And they’ll wet your sonic palate even further with their hypnotically catchy chorus in “Lost All Track of Time”. You’ll even find a bit of Ambient layered with texture and chaos on “Magnetic South”. So Enjoy what the Prairie Cartel sound like now, the band just discovered Pink Floyd and that’s just the icing.

Where Did All My People Go is a slurry blast through Disco, Indie, Punk Rock and Electro, (depending on what they were ingesting at the time) and plays like an unruly house party that is more about sloppy kissing and jumping up and down and less about that one dude nobody invited getting into fights.

Where Did All My People Go is set for release on November 3rd on Long Nights, Impossible Odds

TRACK LISTING:

KEEP EVERYBODY WARM
SUITCASE PIMP
LOST ALL TRACK OF TIME
CRACKTOWN
BEAUTIFUL SHADOW
HOMICIDE
NARCOTIC INSIDIOUS
TEN FEET OF SNOW
JUST LIKE CHEMICALS
NO LIGHT ESCAPES HERE
COBRASKIN BRIEFCASE
BURNING DOWN THE OTHER SIDE
MAGNETIC SOUTH
FUCK YEAH THAT WIDE
THE GLOW IS GONE

“Enough swagger to bring a little rock music back into the dance club.” – Prefix Magazine

“The next big thing out of the Windy City… raging and carnal… a nervous breakdown on the dance floor.” – Stereosubversion.com

“Cranks the hedonism… a roughed-up, rocked-out take on disco.” – Chicago reader

“A journey of rock, driving punk funk bass action we can’t help but love. Well cool.” – Phonica U.K.

“A sizzler of a debut EP.” – Time Out Chicago

“A crazy electro rock ruckus. Their SXSW set was absolutely a highlight of the week.” – Out The Other

“The Prairie Cartel excel where other electro-based groups just pose.” – Illinois Entertainer

“A three-headed electro rock beast.” – New City

“We know the current love affair between electro and hip hop is appealing but let’s not forget the perennial black sheep of the music family – indie rock. What began as a group of disgruntled musicians who found themselves suddenly getting off on the Chi-city DJ Scene soon turned into an opportunity for the 4 piece to bring their heaving live rock performance into the small sweaty venues that would appreciate their love for the electronic music without being automatically pigeonholed as just another hipster Favorite.” URB Next 100 April 09


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