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Forest Swords – Fjree Feather EP review

The Fjree Feather EP by Forest Swords, is a thirty-three minute long EP that is comprised of six excellent tracks. Forest Swords is a one-man project, the composer? Matt Barnes. His almost sinister, strictly instrumental and electronic compositions are fashioned out of Wirral/Liverpool, UK. Each track on Fjree Feather is generally ominous, captivating, and perpetually diverse. And while each track differs, they all hold the promise of some serious head nodding.

The EP’s first track, ‘Down Steps,’ electronically howls for your attention –setting the perfect mood for the EP. The percussion and bass lay the foundation down for this track at two-minutes in, compelling you to move your head with the beat. The water stills and thirty-seconds later: Boom! Crash! Thundering electric waves introduce intense offerings of awesome to the track. This percussion-heavy song is worth a listen.

Its neighboring track, ‘Red Rocks Fogg,’ has a more contemplative, sentimental tone. It possesses a ‘cease the moment’ kind of attitude with a few nostalgic chords. One of those songs you would add to your music play-list entitled: Create. Don’t have one? Well I do and this song’s the newest addition.

‘Trust Your Blood’ is one track that really stands out to me. Its spooky ‘there’s-something-out-there’ mood is enchanting. For a portion of the song, Barnes repeats a possibly love-related phrase that I can’t quite decipher – regardless, hearing a voice in a of his tracks only beautifies it further.

Within the first few seconds of listening to ‘Riverbed,’ a euphoric wave of satisfaction washed over me. Goose bumps ensued. Matt Barnes is a musical architect in every sense of the word. The haunting sound of this track is responsible for some sort of soul paralysis – hyperbolic, yes, but pretty much the truth. It starts out harmless and then it turns on you. It’s a beautiful sense of betrayal.

Forest Swords’ eerie, peculiar sound is comparable to Black Mold. Matt Barnes and Chad Van Galeen would get along, I think. The two sounds are definitely have their differences but both never cease to amaze.

By Laura Templeton

Second-year journalism student currently enrolled in Humber College.

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