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Father’s Children – Who’s Gonna Save The World review

Father’s Children are a funk/soul outfit from the late 70’s that seemed to have gotten lost in time. So lost that they don’t have a Wikipedia page for God’s sake! However a recent resurgence has put them back in the spotlight again, almost 40 years later.  Their album Who’s Gonna Save The World is an eclectic blend of funk, psychedelic, fusion jazz all tied together over some nice poly-rhythms and R%B rhythms.

This is a really versatile album that displays some really outstanding interplay between the band members.  “Kohoutek” really shows some wicked guitar chops at times sounding like Santana might have stopped by for a track or two. Earth, Wind, and Fire might have event borrowed some vocal harmonies from “In Shallah,” however at the same time you could totally see Steely Dan doing this song too. As I said, it’s a versatile album.  Like a lot of music coming from the African American community at that time, the lyrics of Who’s Gonna Save The World were forged in the fires of pretty bad economic circumstance. You can tell through the songs that Father’s Children are pretty distraught by the world around them and wondering if the troubles the world will ever end.

The track “Father’s Children” is a really cool experimental jazz number that shows the band work as one collective unit, playing off of each other’s every move, more than any other track on the album. “Universal Train” and “Who’s Gonna Save The World” basically sound like Marvin Gaye songs you didn’t know existed. There is even a bit of War’s stretched out jazz breakdowns slathered over some of the tracks. Overall this album is a nice blast from the past. The stylings of the music are obviously dated, but this is just all around good music that is sure to please if you have ever like 70’s soul.

By Charles Sullivan

Charlotte, NC. Music Junkie.
25.

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