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Thrice – Major/ Minor review

Thrice’s new “Major/Minor” might be straight out of an early 2000s alternative station top 40. It sounds a little bit like Tool and a little bit like 3rd eye blind. Heavily distorted guitar solos accompany bombastic drums and Dustin Kensrue’s labored vocals. There are some vague lyrics about stones, birds, and bleeding. Dustin sings, “you don’t care/ you don’t care.” He’s right. This album might as well be ten years old. Having old influences is alright unless the genre is something as tired as early 00s alternative music. This stuff sounded nostalgic when it came out.

It’s impossible to tell what Kensrue is singing about, but it’s vaguely angsty so as to be applicable to anyone. It’s guttural, manly, and down-to-earth. Thrice’s angst is masculine. For those who miss the manly emotiveness of bands like Bush, Seether, or even early Nickleback, Thrice’s “Major/Minor” would be a good listen. They keep the beat simple, slow and dragging. It’s like an alternative version of a slow dance song. Soulful guitar is punctuated by a few beats on the high hat and Dustin Kensrue’s anguish. Despite its name, the album is mostly played in minor keys. The title of the album should probably be “Minor”. Hit three beats on the drum set, play in a minor key, repeat process.

The album is as tired as the name might suggest. Lack of originality is evident in this 10 year old new album. Hearing the same minor loops over and over again creates a depressive overtone to “Major/Minor.” The songs drag along over the course of fifty minutes. There’s plenty of self-righteous anguish, as Dustin Kensrue sings about relationship slights and misfortunes. In “Listen Through Me,” Kensrue declares that he speaks truly, and everything hangs on a word. Whatever this means, it’s loaded with special significance as the singer is apparently in anguish. It’s reminiscent of “now that we’re here, it’s so far away, all the struggle we thought was in vain.” Thrice is a vestige of a past fashion in alternative rock. Post-grunge is dead and so is “Major/ Minor.”

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