Elephant Man Set to Release “Let’s Get Physical,” New CD from Bad Boy/VP Records Joint Venture, On April 8th CD features all star line up including Diddy, Wyclef, Rihanna, Chris Brown, Busta Rhymes, Shaggy, Swizz Beats, Kat Deluna, Mario Winans and Yung Joc

Elephant Man Set to Release “Let’s Get Physical,” New CD from Bad Boy/VP Records Joint Venture, On April 8th CD features all star line up including Diddy, Wyclef, Rihanna, Chris Brown, Busta Rhymes, Shaggy, Swizz Beats, Kat Deluna, Mario Winans and Yung Joc

New York, NY – Dancehall King, Elephant Man, will release his latest studio CD, “Let’s Get Physical,” on April 8, 2008. A long time in the making, the star-studded project is the first release from a new venture which joins Sean “Diddy” Combs’ Bad Boy Records with the largest independent Jamaican music label, VP Records. “Let’s Get Physical” features the hit lead single “Five O,” on which Wyclef appears. The remix for “Five-O” is blazing a trail with rising digital sales and has caught attention at radio with an all star line up from Swizz Beats, Assassin, Yung Joc and Diddy. “Jump,” the hard-hitting, high energy second single, also features Swizz Beats. Barbados-born Rihanna appears on the steamy dance track “Throw Your Hands Up” and Elephant Man-fan Chris Brown lends his vocals to the bouncy “Feel the Steam.” Also check out “Body Talk” featuring Dominican R&B singer Kat Deluna and female rapper Jha Jha, and the hot remix for “The Way We Roll” with Busta and Shaggy. The set is executive produced by Sean “Diddy” Combs, Chris Chin, Harve Pierre and Willie Daniels.

“A true entertainer is versatile and makes music for the world,” says Jamaica-native Elephant Man, dubbed The Energy God by fans because of his high energy stage performances. Elephant Man first stormed on the stage back in 1998 under the wings of Bounty Killa and the Scare Dem Crew. The self-proclaimed Dancehall King is solely responsible for reuniting dancehall music with its fun free-spirited roots.

His debut album, Good 2 Go (VP Records), became a worldwide smash in 2004 with the release of chart topping party tunes like “Signal di Plane” and “Pon di River, Pon di Bank,” the single which snagged him a Source Award for “Dancehall/Reggae Artist of the Year” and the MTV2 nomination at the 2004 MTV Video Music Awards.

Since then, Elephant Man has recorded collaborations with Lil’ Jon on the “Get Low Remix,” R. Kelly on “Reggae Bump Bump,” Pitbull and Daddy Yankee on the “Rah-Rah Remix,” and Janet Jackson on “All Nite (Don’t Stop).”

Elephant Man is excited about his major label joint venture (Bad Boy/VP Records) as he looks forward to making dancehall history with Sean “Diddy” Combs and the entire Bad Boy family. “I’ve been a fan of Bad Boy for the longest time and now I’m Bad Boy for life!,” Ele laughs. “We gonna take dancehall to another level.”

On “Let’s Get Physical,” Elephant Man fuses party tunes with lyrics that speak of the social ills and violence plaguing the people of Jamaica. His notorious dance anthems cascade throughout the record. “With the Bad Boy production and promotion teams, together with the Energy God…It’s gonna be madness” says Elephant Man.

“If you saw me today you are never gonna forget me…my hair, my clothes, my style…I’m crazy man, I’m the Energy God…Father of the Dancehall…”

– Elephant Man

Harve Pierre named President of Bad Boy Records; develops Crazy Joint Production Imprint

HARVE PIERRE NAMED PRESIDENT OF BAD BOY RECORDS; DEVELOPS CRAZY JOINT PRODUCTION IMPRINT

Harve Pierre has been named President of Bad Boy Records, it was announced today by Bad Boy Entertainment founder and CEO Sean “P Diddy” Combs. Pierre will continue to report directly to Combs, and as President, he will oversee the finance, creative, promotional, marketing, A&R, International, and Sales divisions at the label. In addition, his Crazy Joint production imprint will develop artists and projects for the Bad Boy label. Bad Boy Records is a worldwide joint venture between Bad Boy Worldwide Entertainment Group and Warner Music Group.

Pierre, who initially joined Bad Boy upon its inception in 1993, was most recently the label’s Executive Vice President/General Manager/Vice President of A&R. Having literally advanced from intern to President, he has personal, hands-on experience in virtually every area of record company operations. With a career spanning over 20 years, Pierre has evolved into one of the most accomplished members of the new generation of music executives whose work integrates both the creative and business spheres. In addition to his role as senior label executive and A&R head, his numerous creative credits include executive producer, vocal and music producer, artist, songwriter, video director, editor, and TV cast member.

Pierre has worked closely with dozens of artists, among them P Diddy, Notorious B.I.G., SWV, Faith Evans, Cheri Dennis, Total, Mario Winans, The Lox, 112, Shyne, Method Man, Boyz N Da Hood, B5, Cassie, Danity Kane, Yung Joc, Tyrese, Black Rob, Gorilla Zoe, Elephant Man, New Edition, and many more. He has served as Executive Producer on 50 Bad Boy albums, plus 5 projects during a 2-year stint with RCA Records.

“Harve’s promotion to President is well deserved” says Combs “he has been with Bad Boy since the beginning and has worked hard to learn all aspects of the business. He has always been an important part of the A&R process and it is only fitting that Bad Boy would house his imprint, Crazy Joint. I look forward to Harve’s continued success.”

“Harve Pierre is truly a modern day renaissance man,” said Atlantic President Julie Greenwald. “He A&R’s records, directs music videos, spearheads marketing campaigns and runs the Bad Boy label. Harve has become an invaluable partner to us. I join with my entire team on congratulating his much deserved promotion.”

“Harve’s diverse business background has made him a valuable addition to the Bad Boy team and this promotion is in recognition of all the hard work he has put in over the years,” says Lyor Cohen, Chairman and CEO of U.S. Recorded Music for Warner Music Group.

“Harve is one of the chief architects of the Bad Boy culture and this promotion reflects the dedication, consistency, and commitment he has brought to the company,” said Kevin Liles, Executive Vice President, Warner Music Group. “Harve has done much more than work at Bad Boy Records — he lives the Brand and has helped provide the foundation that will lead Bad Boy into its next decade.”

Harve first met fellow New Yorker Sean “P Diddy” Combs at Howard University in Washington D.C., where the two students promoted campus parties, both together and separately. When Combs began to shuttle between D.C. and New York City to intern at Uptown Records, Pierre remained at Howard, earning a degree in Business and Hospitality Management. Following graduation, he worked in hotel management and owned his own restaurant.

In 1992, Harve returned to his first love, music, when he joined P Diddy at Uptown, where Combs had become the label’s VP of A&R. He started out as an intern for his college buddy, setting up studio sessions for the likes of Mary J. Blige and Jodeci. When P Diddy was notoriously fired from his Uptown post, Harve left with him to help launch Bad Boy Entertainment. Starting out as P Diddy’s assistant, he was quickly promoted to Director of A&R, overseeing the production of Craig Mack’s Project: Funk Da World, among other projects.

In 1995, Harve left Bad Boy to broaden his experience in the music industry. He became Associate Director of Black Music at RCA Records, giving him invaluable major label experience. In 1997, with hit albums from SWV, Rome, and Shante Savage under his belt, Harve returned to his home, Bad Boy.

Back at Bad Boy, Harve advanced from Vice President of A&R to Senior Vice President in 1999 and Executive Vice President/General Manager in 2003, all the while retaining his role as head of A&R. In 2002, when Bad Boy inked a deal with MTV, Harve made his television debut when he was cast in the hit show, Making The Band 2, for two seasons.

Pierre has also earned a reputation as an innovative video director and editor, pioneering a number of video techniques. Among his video credits are serving as director of “Dead Wrong” for the Notorious B.I.G. and “Special Delivery” for G-Dep, as well as editing most of director Hype Williams’ earlier work. Pierre has edited 35 music videos to date which includes “Victory” for P Diddy featuring Notorious B.I.G., “One More Chance” for the Notorious B.I.G., OutKast’s breakthrough first video, “Playalistic,” and “Flava In Ya Ear” by Craig Mack – the first artist and #1 smash single released by Bad Boy. Among his recent work, Pierre edited the chart-topping videos for Block Ent’s Yung Joc smash singles, the #1, Grammy-nominated “It’s Goin’ Down” and “I Know You See It,” just to name a few.

Pierre has also started building his Crazy Joint imprint, to be distributed by Bad Boy/Atlantic Records beginning in May 2008.

Elephant Man interview

Elephant Manby Dru Hepkins

Since the Shabba Ranks explosion in the late 80’s and early 90’s, every so often, a “colorful” new Dance Hall king comes forth and captures our attention at the top. With a plethora of steady hits, the electrifying performer, Elephant Man, has thrown his weight in the dance hall scene and his presence is felt internationally. Signed to Bad Boy, Elephant Man intends to continuously mash up the scene with his new album “Let’s Get Physical” in stores August 14th.

MVRemix: Ele, watta g’wan?

Elephant Man: What’s poppin’ Dru?

MVRemix: I’m good, I’m good. I’m also from yard so first tell us which part a yard you come from?

Elephant Man: Okay, okay. I’m from Kingston – you know Sea view Garden?

MVRemix: Ya man. When did you first realize you wanted to be a performer and what avenues did you take to get there?

Elephant Man: Well I realize I wanted to be a performer when I was a kid. I didn’t do no more work than entertainment because…I just woke up one day……you know Shabba Ranks lived just a couple of gates down from my gate, and we looked up to Shabba like that – you know? Then at like 14 or 15 I was like yo – this is what I want to do.

MVRemix: Of all the hits you have like “Dutty wine” to “Bad Mon Forward” – which is your personal favorite?

Elephant Man: “Pon de River”. That’s the one that started everything you know man? In America, Jamaica – all over. That’s the one that brought back the Dance Hall you know?

MVRemix: In the hip hop world, you always hear about beef between artists; Do you see beef or similar drama between Dance Hall artists?

Elephant Man: Yeah, they got beef with each other in the Dance Hall – but the beef is not for me man. I just do music to make people enjoy it you know? It’s not like you’re going to get a house or a platinum record or a Grammy from the beef so it don’t make sense. It only bring death, and violence and bad vibes you feel me?

MVRemix: You mentioned, and I read of your being neighbors with Shabba. Describe how he was a hero to you.

Elephant Man: Growing up in the ghetto, Shabba Ranks was the first big star we know. He always gave back to the people and you know – take care of the people in the community.

MVRemix: And how did he do that?

Elephant Man: You see when he would come back from the US, he gave away money and all of that.

MVRemix: Now describe your union with Mr. Sean Combs and your adjustment to the Bad Boy family.

Elephant Man: Well you see Puffy, that’s my friend from a longer time you know? And right now – we bad boys so anything goes. But we cool and everybody understand each other – and Puffy know that he signed a Dance Hall artist not a hip hop artist so you know…

MVRemix: Do you take any pride or accomplishment in being the first Dance Hall artist he signed?

Elephant Man: Of course you got to take pride and know that Puffy got into Dance Hall [with me] and that was a big move. You just got to give thanks and – you don’ know – just represent to the fullest.

MVRemix: In creating songs, what’s your motivation and what are you aiming to achieve in each record?

Elephant Man: I talk about positive things and I talk about reality you know. It got to mean something.

MVRemix: How do you usually compose a song? Are you directly involved with the beat making?

Elephant Man: I’m involved with the beat making a lot because like last night we were in the studio and I ask them to get me someone who play the piano and we do songs together and I tell them put that there, don’t put that – you know? We give 100 percent. That’s why when we do songs it that good because the people around you are good and you are good at what you do. It’s not like they just say come DJ this and you get up and just DJ – you put it how you want it. When everybody put them idea together now – that’s when – boom.

MVRemix: What do you prefer as an artist; do you prefer the process of creating new songs or do you prefer to perform?

Elephant Man: I like to create new songs and I like to perform. Without creating new songs you can’t perform.

MVRemix: So you like them equally?

Elephant Man: Equal. 1 on 1.

MVRemix: In the Dance Hall scene, who is doing it right now for you besides yourself?

Elephant Man: You got Sean Paul, Beanie Man, Buju Banton, Bounty Killer, Sizzla…

MVRemix: Has there ever been a rough patch in your career that really slowed you down considerably.

Elephant Man: Yeah – when they were spreading rumor on me.

MVRemix: Rumors like what?

Elephant Man: A lot of rumors. You know people spread rumors like wow. But God run the world so you just have to overcome the evil you know?

MVRemix: Did you ever imagine yourself to be as big as you are now?

Elephant Man: No. But I know I’m a hard worker and I knew it would pay off though. And everything I do I do it from my heart and not for the money because I love to do it you know?

MVRemix: Very refreshing to hear nowadays.

Elephant Man: Yeah man.

MVRemix: Everyone associates Jamaicans with Rastafarianism. What are your beliefs?

Elephant Man: Well, I’m into the Jesus side of it you know? I’m not a Rastafarian but [Halle] Salassie was a great king, but my God is Jesus; the Creator who made heaven and earth and the One who send Jesus to die for everybody sin.

MVRemix: So you’re Christian?

Elephant Man: Well, I’m not a Christian but you know – I go with the Bible. I can’t tell you that Salassie is God or not but I believe my God is the King.

MVRemix: What was one of your most unusual or craziest nights in showbiz?

Elephant Man: In New York at the Reggae Caravan in 2004, I was performing on stage in the stadium. Right as I was singing “Signal de plane”, plane flew directly over the stadium. Crazy man.

MVRemix: What’s your opinion about Reggaeton? Is it flattery? Does it help or hurt Reggae; does it steal some of its thunder – what opinion to do you have?

Elephant Man: Well – their doing their own thing. They ain’t stealing nothing from Reggae. Their doing their own thing – it’s a different language, it’s a different marketing, a different everything. No disrespect to them.

MVRemix: Anything you want to promote or want people to know?

Elephant Man: Well the album “Let’s Get Physical” coming out on August 14th.

MVRemix: Anything else?

Elephant Man: Love God and live man.

Original Article