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50 cent G-Unit Reviews Young Buck

G-Unit – Beg For Mercy review

G-Unitwritten by Low Key

February 6, 2003, the legacy of 50 Cent and G-Unit was etched into the walls of Hip-Hop history. “Get Rich Or Die Tryin” was the number one album in the world and G-Unit was cemented as one of the future leaders of Hip-Hop. At the time the group could do no wrong, as every mixtape and featured appearance caused an uproar in the streets. It was indeed their time to shine and the group took advantage of it. However, as with many artists, there is a small window of time in which success like this occurs. How long would it be before this window closed and 50 Cent, Lloyd Banks, Tony Yayo & Young Buck were left on the outside looking in? It appears this time has come on the group’s debut album “Beg For Mercy”.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews The Game

The Game – The Documentary review

The Gamewritten by Low Key

Wake up, the west coast is back! From the depths of Compton’s mean streets comes Dr. Dre’s newest protégée The Game. Armed with a quick temper, rough demeanor and sharp tongue, The Game has been molded by the industry’s best to be the savior of the west coast. His debut release, The Documentary, is a fitting tribute to those that have paved the way before him and is an album that will certainly put the west back on the map.

Overall, The Documentary is a tale of two stories. On the one hand, Game’s debut release is one of the best-produced albums of the last three years. With a star-studded lineup of producers ranging from Dr. Dre to Kanye West and Just Blaze, Game’s beat selection is masterful. However, on the other hand, his lyrical performance fails to live up to the beats he is rhyming on. As a rookie emcee, Game stubbles throughout The Documentary with his one-dimensional rhymes and continuous name-dropping. There is not much creativity to Game’s lyrics and his flow is almost non-existent on every track. However, even worse is Game’s obsession with name-dropping, something that gets old very quickly. The constant mentioning of Dr. Dre, Eazy E, N.W.A., Biggie, 2pac and Nike Air Force One’s grows tiresome after the first couple of songs, let alone the entire album. Every verse on The Documentary follows this pattern of name-dropping, making it very clear that Game is an emcee with not much to say.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews

The Game – The Documentary review

The Gamewritten by Scav

“How could I not sell a million when I’m rappin’ on Dre hits?” G-Unit’s latest addition and Dr. Dre protégé The Game raps on the Eminem-produced “We Ain’t” – and, in so many words, he’s right.

With names like Dr. Dre, Scott Storch, Timbaland, Kanye West, Just Blaze, Eminem, and DJ Hi-Tek providing the bump-in-the-trunk for Game’s debut solo album The Documentary, his introduction into the hip-hop world is not exactly a B-list effort from the hopeful G-Unit rookie.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews The Game

The Game – The Documentary review

The Gamewritten by Plus One

What shocks me about this world is its injustice, in every aspect. But in this case, it’s with music. An emcee with a rough voice, but little talent who comes from Compton somehow manages to become the biggest thing since 50 Cent? Unfortunately, that’s the case with Game. At best, Game’s barely an average emcee.

For some reason, Game chooses to reference popular musicians excessively upon every track on “The Documentary.” Dr. Dre, his G-Unit affiliates, Eazy E, Tupac, Biggie and Compton are referenced more times than are worth counting – on every track! To say it becomes annoying would be an understatement.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews

Lloyd Banks – The Hunger For More review

Lloyd Bankswritten by Low Key

It is hard to stay hungry when you have been as successful as Lloyd Banks. The mixtape phenom has achieved a level of superstardom that is rarely seen from an artist without a solo album under his belt. The punch line king has been met with tons of critical praise regarding his work on various collaborations and G-Unit releases. However, the question still remained, could Lloyd Banks achieve true success on his own? The answer to this comes in the form of his first solo album “The Hunger For More”, where Banks proves he can hold his own without 50 by his side.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews Young Buck

Young Buck – Straight Outta Cashville review

Young Buckwritten by Christopher “Scav” Yuscavage

Young Buck is “Straight Outta Ca$hville” – a place that seems to only pack guns, violence, drugs, money, and oddly-placed “Kill Bill” samples into a space known more for its guitar-wielding country music legends that its gun-toting hip-hop artists.

While the previous Southern-bias has all but been eliminated from hip-hop (see the success of Lil’ Jon, Outkast, etc.), fans of metropolitan East coast hip-hop will be surprised by G-Unit’s Buck, a charismatic, if not cocky and brash, Southern-drawled rapper with a chip on his shoulder and a style comparable to mentor 50 Cent. While no lyrical genius by any standards, Buck’s performances are less punchline (unlike labelmate Lloyd Banks) and more punch with a knack for all the aforementioned evils. Still, his limited range of topics quickly grow thinner than rumors of Elvis still roaming Nashville, with the result being the stale “Ca$hville.”

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews

Tony Yayo – Thoughts of a Predicate Felon review

Tony Yayowritten by Plus One

As we entered 2003, G-Unit’s 50 Cent became the world’s biggest rapper. His audience, spiralling off of Dr. Dre and Eminem grew to extremes as his records began flying off shelves. Initially, G-Unit only publicly consisted of Tony Yayo, Lloyd Banks and 50. That was of course until Yayo got locked up. After serving his time, Tony got out and went back in on the same day.

Now, having “finally” gotten out. Yayo, the self dubbed “Talk of New York” releases his debut “Thoughts of a Predicate Felon,” and it’s nothing short of what we expected.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews Young Buck

Young Buck – Straight Outta Cashville review

Young Buckwritten by Brainiac

Getting straight to the point, Young Buck has given us one the most inconsistent solo debut out of all three G-Unit members. His debut album entitled “Straight Outta Cashville” is twenty tracks deep with just one interlude that clearly favors quantity over quality. What could’ve been a far better album if it was reduced to a solid twelve to fourteen, is instead an overall average album in which over 50% ranges from average to just plain awful.

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50 cent G-Unit Reviews

Get Rich or Die Trying OST review

GRODT OSTwritten by Plus One

One thing that Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson has proven is that he can capitalize on things; his autobiography, video games, clothing and now movie. The funny thing is though, if you’ve seen “Get Rich or Die Trying,” like many have already said, it appears to be a two hour soundtrack promo. The film doesn’t compare to the director’s other work and the film overall is a disappointment.

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Eminem Reviews

8 Mile Soundtrack Review

8 Milewritten by Low Key

Looking at the “8 Mile Soundtrack’s” track listing one might think this album has the chance to be one of the greatest soundtracks ever released. 5 new Eminem tracks and brand new Xzibit, 50 Cent, Jay-z, Nas, Gangstarr and Rakim tracks! The lineup is simply amazing! However, looks can be deceiving and that’s exactly the story with the “8 Mile Soundtrack”.

How can a soundtrack with such a spectacular lineup of Hip-Hop legends come out this disappointing is the question everyone is asking themselves. While the biggest names in Hip-Hop appear on most of the “8 Mile Soundtrack”, unfortunately most of the tracks on the album fall into the category of throw away/filler. Jay-z & Nas both appear on the soundtrack, however not to the anticipation we expected. “You Wanna Be Me” is a horribly produced Nas track that is more reminiscent of Nas’s “Nastradamus” days than anything. The lyrically boring track is an obvious throwaway track as the production is truly horrendous. “8 Miles and Running” featuring Jay-z and Freeway sees much better production from none other than Marshall Mathers himself, however both Jay and Freeway deliver less than stellar performances on the mic, making the track very bland. Jay once again puts forth an uninspired verse that does nothing but disappoint, as the tracks hook is equally annoying.

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