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Big Sean – Finally Famous album review

Finally Famous Sean Don aka Big Sean finally has a barcode out and about on Tuesday June 28. The G.O.O.D. music signed MC has been waiting in the wings for this opportunity ever since he dropped a sixteen in front of Mr. Yeezy back in ’05. The Finally Famous mix tape series — volumes one through three — having been deemed a success built his buzz to the point were it was time to drop the barcode on them. The snap-backer from the class of Freshman 10 was looking to translate his buzz into a dope frosh CD and cement his place in the game as one of the brightest lights in the new school.

First caught on to Big Sean from word of mouth from a mutual friend who usually knows good music. Listened to Finally Famous Volume 3 and a couple songs off his other mixtapes like “Millionaire” and enjoyed his style/swag. The only problem I saw was the consistency. Some of his tracks were hot while others just did not seem to have the same oomph. How that would translate to a actual official release was a fair question. After hearing his first two singles, “Hands Up In the Air” featuring Chris Brown and “I Do It” hesitance set in. “Hands Up In The Air” had no substance no conviction and “I Do It” was swagging, minus the video, but it did not “do it” for me.

After the countless times this CD got pushed back for a laundry list of reasons people were wondering if it would ever make the shelves. Well it is here and after listening to this one front to back a couple times all that comes to mind is this is one of the most uninspiring CDs in recent memory. The singing style/rap style has been done and more cleanly feel for example Drake. On tracks like “What Goes Around” and “Don’t Tell Me You Love Me” you can tell Big Sean and singing hooks are not really a strength. Even though Drake may have “borrowed” his style a few times he pulled it off more flawlessly than Big Sean when he attempts to return the favor.

How can you not question his ear for beats with such selections as “Dance(ASS)” produced by Da Internz? You have Mr. Yeezy in your corner how did this song get on this CD? It is terrible. This CD is almost sleep inducing. With out question put Lasers and Rolling Papers ahead of this and both of those were uber pop. Will it sell? Maybe but if you are not a fourteen year old white girl — Mr. Do It’s demographic — can not really see how you could proclaim this ill. He has sick punchlines and the lyrics are on point for the most part but will you be listening to this CD in 10 years? Is it classic? No albeit not even close. “Detroit’s Angel” literally got got bodied on every track with a guest spot. No other rapper named Big got bodied on every single one of his tracks with guest appearances. The energy every guest brings does not seem to be matched and half the CD is filled with guest appearances from Wiz to The Dream.

Why is he talking for 2 minutes at the end of “So Much More”? Why so many guest appearances? Where are the bangers on this? “I Do It” and “My House” are the conceivable answers although the auto-tune on “My House” is really not needed. So many questions. He has superb cadence and metre and his movement is moving but this CD is not on the level with a lot of what is already out. Tough to relate to any of it and after listening to it a couple times one is not compelled to. Even where he tries to get personal — “Memories” ft John Legend for example — it is hard not to scoff a bit. Not to say he has no problems but does not come of as though he cares about them because he does not make you care. If asked to describe this CD briefly it could be said that it is melancholy almost to the point of it being passionless. There is no real give you those goosebump bars with that hair stand up feel. The singing/rap thing is almost played out already but in all earnesty it has been done better i.e. Drake and Wiz. Save your money.

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Big Sean – Finally Famous album review

Detroit rapper Big Sean says he’s ‘finally famous,’ and if the VIP cast on his album of the same name is any indication, you should probably take him seriously. Finally Famous is the symbol of Big Sean’s glamorous come-up in the rap industry – and glamorous this album is. As his first studio album, it’s the culmination of his grandiose dreams of making it big, all the way from rapping for the first time for Kanye at a local Detroit radio station, to collaborating on Finally Famous with the likes of Lupe Fiasco, Rick Ross, and John Legend.

If Big Sean wanted to make an album that was going to achieve national radio play and catch the attention of the mass r&b/rap/hip hop circuit, he hit the mark right on target. Kanye West, The-Dream, Pharrell, and Chris Brown are just a few of the superstars that join the aforementioned names on Finally Famous. And there simply isn’t a contemporary pop/hip hop radio station in the country that hasn’t already suffocated its listeners’ eardrums with Sean’s and Chris Brown’s “My Last.” We can probably reasonably assume the same destiny for the stoner anthem, “High,” on which Big Sean collaborates with Wiz Khalifa and Chiddy Bang.

Though the album boasts a healthy dose of celebrity and glitz, it’s easy to drown in the stew of superstars that is Finally Famous. At some point I got so confused and disoriented that I thought I’d accidentally picked up “Now 80.” Finally Famous is simply a mash-up of collaborative tracks in which Big Sean spews mediocre rhymes and dull analogies (case in point: “Took longer than expected, Came back around like a necklace”) that are otherwise interspersed with vocals by folks who are, well, famous-er.

I’m not saying I didn’t enjoy Finally Famous. “So Much More” gets some major cool points for boasting a Motown-reminiscent melody with its piano and tambourine. And as flashy as “Celebrity” may be, whenever the song comes on, I’ve got to get up and dance. Yes, Finally Famous is an r&b-loaded album that’s got beat, it’s versatile, and with its celebrity players, is going to appeal to lots of different demographics. But therein also lies the problem: Big Sean simply gets lost in the big-shot pandemonium. It’s too hard to tell whether his skills would shine on another, more understated album with less collaborations. That’s not a good sign.

Sometimes an artist wants to be known for his appeal to a discerning audience. Sometimes it’s about being the best in his genre. And sometimes, it’s just about finally being famous.